And so another year of SXSW has come and gone. We here at GSD&M find ourselves reflecting on all of the great music artists that graced our backyard, hallways and our hearts. Sometimes it’s hard to imagine we call this place work.

To commemorate all of the wonderful sights and sounds, we created individual pieces of art for every artist to sign for the agency and to take home for themselves as well.

There were no boundaries to this project except to have each designer visually create their own interpretation of the artist they were assigned.

Here’s a look into the inspiration behind some of the artists’ respective pieces:

Laura Guardalabene, Jr. Designer (Eliot Sumner)

“Much of Eliot Sumner’s dark electro-rock tracks have an angsty sadness to them while remaining uptempo and danceable. She has an androgynous, masculine tone to her voice and often sings about relationships, sexuality, uncertainty and alienation. Sumner doesn’t identify as any gender and is part of the current gender fluidity movement. This poster represents intertwining genders and breaking traditional hetero-normative barriers. It plays with masculinity and femininity by juxtaposing soft fluid shapes with angular geometric forms. There is inherent tension to the piece and at the same time balance to it.”

Ben Harman, Assoc. Design Director (Ghostland Observatory)

“After a few years on hiatus, Ghostland Observatory would soon be headlining our annual GSD&M party during SXSW. After considering various visual elements to include in the design, we decided on the following: an abstract phoenix rising out of the dust to symbolize Ghostland’s reemergence into the music scene; a modernized Native American illustration style and color palette, reflecting the stylistic influences of lead singer Aaron Behrens; and lasers (an essential part of any Ghostland show).”

Summer Ortiz, Studio Artist (The Heavy)

“The Heavy’s music is energetic and fun and felt very colorful to me. The band seems to have cultivated a really cool, vintage-inspired style, and I wanted to incorporate both those elements into the poster I made for them. I came up with the idea of a colorful, fun house party scenario just waiting for them, existing in contrast to the quiet, muted surroundings.”

Adriane Joseph, Presentation Production Artist (Joseph)

“Joseph is labeled as ‘dark, folk-pop.’ Their style conveys a sense of feeling most at home when surrounded by nature up in the Pacific Northwest, where the three sisters who make up Joseph are from. Their sound is folksy and delicate with a subtle haunting vibe. For these reasons I was drawn to the idea of an overgrown forest floor with the band’s name carved into a tree. The colors are earthy and muted with pockets of pink and yellow to add just a touch of femininity.”

We had all different kinds of creative cloth pitch in, and in the end, it left us with 13 wildly different directions of visual thought. That’s the beauty of music and art—they’re always in bed together. Giving you either adoration for the ear or love for the eyes.

A quick shout out to all of the artists that made this project possible and such a success. Thank you.

Summer Ortiz, Studio Artist
Frank Benavides, Creative Intern
Laura Guardalabene, Jr. Designer
Steve Wolf, Designer
Adriane Joseph, Presentation Production Artist
Greg Thomas, Designer
Dustin Coffey, Assoc. Design Director
Ben Harman, Assoc. Design Director
Ryan Warner, Art Director

It’s that time of year again. Filmmakers, musicians, thought-leaders and entrepreneurs gather in Austin, Texas to share their talent and ideas, all while keeping Austin weird.

Here at GSD&M, we take SXSW seriously. We throw an enormous party, attend countless panels and participate in as many events as possible during the week. This is a conference that reflects so many values our company stands for – curiosity, restlessness and community, just to name a few.

So, I wanted to invite you into knowing why SXSW is so valuable to us. Here are some notable reasons why we remain involved in the conference year after year.

Drinking from Firehoses

“SXSW is one of the things that makes Austin, Austin. It’s an incredibly unique time that brings together minds that can solve the world’s biggest problems, create Oscar-winning feats in film and unite generations with music. It reminds me that there’s no one right way to solve a problem and that our little advertising world is barely a fraction of what’s interesting in culture. No other festival gives you such a varied Austin experience or a ‘drink from the firehose’ dose of inspiration.”

–Elizabeth Thompson, Strategy Director

Screen-Shot-2016-03-18-at-2.16.17-PM

Not your Average Trade Show

“It’s never the same experience. Some years I’ve left wanting to leverage new technologies and some years I’ve incorporated new thinking into things we are already doing, or been armed with information that brought about change. For me it’s the best week to really absorb what is happening in the digital space.”

“For the agency, we benefit from having a flood of energized employees with new ideas. There is always a great vibe after SXSW and you can really see those individual takeaways make their way into the work for the remainder of the year and beyond.”

 “As for Austin, it’s a huge economy boost. However, I think there is also a sense of pride that comes with being able to say that for two weeks the best, brightest and most talented people in the interactive and entertainment space choose to come to our city and share knowledge. I’ve been to various trade shows but this isn’t that. It’s a platform for knowledge and talent sharing that I’ve never experienced elsewhere.”

–Amy Torres, Digital Producer

 It’s in the Bag

“SXSW means the best concentration of innovation, music and film from all over the country. For the agency, it means all of this is in your backyard, so embrace it and dive in.  For Austin, it’s a mixed bag. It means traffic woes, long lines, next to impossible dinner options and a shit load of tax revenue.  One of the best parts of SXSW is the discovery of things around the corner.  You have to get out and wander to find it but it’s always new and different. Walk around the convention center and listen or join in on conversations taking place inside or outside the many panel sessions.  Walk around outside the convention center and do the same.  Walk down 6th between Congress and 35 and see the freak show spectacle during music. It’s guaranteed to be more exciting than the last Mad Max sequel.”

–David Rockwood, VP/Community Relations

Conversation Convergence

“SXSW is the one time of year where the internet shows up at our front door in person. Literally, the people you watch, read, and enjoy online end up roaming around town for a week. A lot of the time I get more out of the conversations and relationships that are built than the panels themselves (though they can be great too).”

–Rye Clifton, Experience Director 

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What happens at SXSW wakes up the minds of all involved, from panel participants to concert goers. It’s fuel to GSD&Mers who take away ideas that shape their work and lives.

Some of our favorite ads of all time owe their awesomeness to the music supervisor working diligently behind the scenes to secure the perfect track. During SXSW, our VP/Community (and wearer of many hats including music supervisor) David Rockwood met up with the guys at Jingle Punks to talk music and advertising.

 

It’s been a busy few weeks here in Austin, with SXSW Interactive and the 4A’s Transformation conference taking place back to back. While attending these events and learning about the latest-and-greatest in technology, innovation and creativity, I must admit I did the unthinkable — I let my phone die.

I’ll start by saying that “let” is a loose term. My phone is on its last leg, and perhaps I’m not quite careful enough about charging it. Point being there were dozens of areas around the conferences to plug in and charge back up if I wanted. But I didn’t.

At first, my decision not to recharge seemed questionable.

Oh no, how will I get this free t-shirt if my phone is dead and I can’t tweet about it (the requirement for getting the t-shirt)?

Turns out, the girl running the contest was quite understanding. Since I couldn’t tweet about it we chatted instead, and I ended up “pinky promising” her I would tweet later. Definitely haven’t pinky promised since 2001 (win).

How will I look up the panel information ahead of time?

With no phone, I couldn’t re-read up on the speakers and panels. Instead, I was excited all over again as each speaker and topic was introduced. While other people texted, browsed, or posted throughout the talks, I gave my full attention since I had no distractions. I even took some notes…using a pen and paper.

What time is it?!

Asking strangers for the time may not be an ideal conversation starter, but it led me to meet some interesting people. I wound up meeting a guy who managed to sneak into all the SXSW badge-only events without a badge, and a woman who lived on the same city as my sister.

Ok, so my phone died twice in one week, big deal.

But it was kind of a big deal. At these conferences about interacting and connecting, there is wonderful technology everywhere and a lot of people using it to connect. But for me, disconnecting was an unexpectedly positive experience. In my last panel of the day at SX the speaker stated: “Our cell phones know we are all in this room.”

Everyone’s did except for mine. Because it was dead. Which turns out was, actually, kind of cool.

By Summer Ortiz, Studio Artist

SXSW can be overwhelming—one moment you’re having your mind blown by an insightful panelist and the next you’re walking by a giant squirrel reading a book. Sometimes sketching things out is the best way to take it all in. Here are some visuals about life, liberty and the pursuit of SXSW by first-time attendee Studio Artist Summer Ortiz.

 

SXSW Essentials. #sxsw #gsdm #illustration #drawing #sketch

A photo posted by Summer (@signifyingnot) on Mar 13, 2015 at 11:15am PDT

SXSW is not conducive to a large personal bubble. #sxsw #gsdm #illustration #drawing #sxsketch

A photo posted by Summer (@signifyingnot) on Mar 14, 2015 at 10:34am PDT

UX meets animation. #sxsw #gsdm #panel #uxchoreography #ux #illustration #sxsketch #disney #sketch #doodle

A photo posted by Summer (@signifyingnot) on Mar 15, 2015 at 10:39am PDT

The Glasses of SXSWi. #sxsw #gsdm #sxsketch #illustration #drawing #sketch #doodle

A photo posted by Summer (@signifyingnot) on Mar 15, 2015 at 10:42am PDT

Innovation. #sxsw #gsdm #advocacy #advocate #illustration #drawing #type

A photo posted by Summer (@signifyingnot) on Mar 16, 2015 at 11:29am PDT

photo

I’ve nearly always been a planner, relished sketching out the blow-by-blow for any given day, vacation or event, seeking the best way to optimize my enjoyment of the experience at hand. Then I had kids. And yes, I still do a lot of planning for things directly related to my job of course and select household projects, but my energy and thrill for strict insistence on planning for everything seems to have faded on multiple levels over the last several years.

Cut scene to my second-ever SXSW conference today. In my defense, I was given my formal registration late…as in…Thursday. I kept meaning to glance over the panels and different events before arriving at the Convention Center Saturday morning…but well, I chose to put out my fires at work and then play with my kids when I was home instead. So it felt almost alien to arrive for badge pickup and truly have no idea where I was heading after I tossed it round my neck. Those who have always been carefree souls will laugh at my discomfort as I tried to follow in their footsteps nonchalantly, pretending that this knot of anxiety and uncertainty had not suddenly welled up in my belly. And then I suddenly decided, “!*%& it, where will the day take me?” Cut to anyone who has known me for many years crying “Scandal!”

And I started strolling around the convention center, relishing all the people watching, accents and energy already in motion. I casually passed the PBSAnywhere Lounge hosting…Cookie Monster. So I went in and kissed Cookie Monster. (Call me a hussy.) I started toward a panel I was mildly interested in, feeling pangs of guilt about not jumping right in, but then realized I should save my brain for the panels that really leapt out at me and that I was really hungry. So I stopped and ate at this awesome BBQ stand that seemed to just materialize beside me, my anxiety lessening with the assistance of berry cobbler.

The remainder of the day passed in a similarly fluid manner. I attended a responsive design discussion, and though the hosts were entertaining, I was most engaged by the nice woman who let me take the open seat beside her before everything began. I chose to chat with her beforehand instead of Googling the panelists’ bios. I wandered downtown observing visitors and the various installations that had popped up for the event. I went with the flow.

I scanned the afternoon schedule and was intrigued by the Girl Power(ed) panel due to the onslaught of media coverage of late about the gender gaps in the high-tech sector. I followed my instincts and am so glad I did. The panel discussion was lively and featured three women openly sharing their passion for their respective tech fields and the particular challenges they have navigated. When Girl Power(ed) closed, I stood to leave but noticed the next session in the room was She’s a C-Word! Lessons from Tech’s C-Suite Women. How can you not attend a panel with ovaries enough to craft a title like that? So in the zone of the women in tech topic, I sat right back down. Moderated by Re/Code’s Kara Swisher and filled with female executives steeped in the rigors of life in Silicone Valley, the discussion that unfolded about mentorship, female leadership and the critical importance of diversity to a company’s ultimate bottom line was one of best panels I’ve ever seen. Ultimately, I think my interest in the gender diversity challenge of tech is rooted in reality of the witnessing the diversity gaps that exist in advertising and marketing as well. Many industries suffer from a “disease of homogeneity” for lack of more eloquence, and I am happy about the attention shining on our sisters in tech because I think these high-profile discussions will inform our own domain.

What I am most happy about though, is how for at least today, I threw my hands up in the air and let the SXSW wind take me where it may. It was liberating, and I think more true to what the spirit of SXSW was years ago. Much better than my previous festival attendance certainly, and I plan to do the same thing again…tomorrow.

A perfect SXSW day to each and all!

It was a long few weeks of welding, soldering, coding, recoding and music mixing. And despite a few close encounters with a blowtorch, we did it. On November 7, Beat Bikes launched at Fun Fun Fun Fest.

Earlier this year, Austin B-cycle, the bike-sharing system here in Austin, enlisted the help of GSD&M. Since then, we’ve been intent on transforming Austin B-cycle into an Austin institution. Like the bike-sharing equivalent of breakfast tacos. Or roller derby. Or chicken $#!% bingo. You get the idea.

As a part of this plan, we set out to expand Austin B-cycle’s presence at Austin’s festival circuit. So we collaborated with our friends at Dell to invent something the world had never seen. We call it an interactive pedal-operated, beat-switching, music mash-up machine. Or if you’re into catchy titles, Beat Bikes. (more…)

Hipsters, start your engines. SXSW 2015 will be here before we know it. Planning for our 2015 SXSW Party is in full swing and the SXSW Panelpicker is open for business.This year, GSD&M has two panels in the running, one for SXSW Interactive and the other for SXSports (truth be told, we have lots of other things in the works, too—but we’re not ready to show our hand just yet).

Help a sister/brother/agency out and give our panels (below) a “thumbs up” before voting ends Sept. 5.

See you in March in Austin!

Cultures of Advocacy: People, Product & Change

Jefferson Burruss, GSD&M

Heather Hvidsten, Southwest Airlines

Elizabeth Brownsen, Team One

Tricia Nichols, Gap Inc.

Vote here and tweet this to spread the word: What is a ‘culture of advocacy’ and why should you care? Vote for this panel from @jeffersonb at @GSDM gsdm.biz/1qkB2rT #SXSW

A Laser Shot My Ball: Tracking the PGA TOUR

Brian Woyt, PGA Tour

Tweet this to spread the word: What do lasers have to do with pro golf? Vote for this panel from @daverockwood and the @PGATour gsdm.biz/1qkBwyl #gsdm #SXSW

What do you get when you put The Wild Feathers, Aaron Behrens, Aloe Blacc and The Hold Steady on stage all on the same night?

Add food, drinks, a photo booth and a few thousand of our closest friends, and you have GSD&M’s 2014 SXSW Party.

We made a video recapping the best moments and are reliving the glory as we speak. Viva SXSW 2015!

Graduation is quickly approaching and the hunt for jobs for college students is on. Jocelyn Lai teamed up with Working Not Working’s Justin Gignac at this year’s SXSW to discuss using your online network to get a job in real life. Let’s be honest, this is great advice whether you are graduating college or if you’ve been out for many years.

Check out her presentation here:

SXSW 2013: Using Your Online Network to Get a Job #IRL from Jocelyn Lai

You can also view it with full sound and motion here: www.bit.ly/ajobIRLdeck.